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1956 COA.jpgThe very impressive doors of Martins Bank’s new branch at Burton upon Trent open for business in May 1956, and Martins Bank Magazine wastes no time in paying the staff an early visit. It probably seems quaint to us now, that the Bank’s Chief Accountant had already told off the new branch staff for using the locally accepted name Burton ON Trent, instead of UPON! These days there are perhaps more important things to think about. Burton upon trent is one of twenty-one Martins Bank Branches that actually “take over” their local Barclays Branch at the time of the 1969 merger.  The premises at 1 Station Road are deemed superior to those of Barclays at 178 High Street which is closed on 12 December 1969.

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1956 03 MBM.jpg

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1956 Burton upon Trent Exterior 2 BGA Ref 30-490

Image © Barclays Ref 0030/0490

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1956 Burton upon Trent Staff MBM-Au56P10.jpgOur visit to the new branch at Burton on June 12th started on a controversial note, for only that morning Chief Accountant's Department, Head Office, had reproached the branch for heading one of its correspondence forms" Burton on Trent " instead of “Burton upon Trent” as on the official letter heading and cheques. One of the first things we noticed was the cheque of another bank printed " Burton on Trent" and on various office buildings the same style.   Rather like Newcastle on Tyne which is officially Newcastle upon Tyne though both styles are widely used. Two or three years ago a North-Easterner whose identity I have forgotten explained to me why " upon" is correct and "on" isn't. I cannot remember the explanation but would be glad to hear of it again, which is the reason for mentioning the incident here. Anyway, the legal title of the place is Burton upon Trent, and our authority is the Town Clerk.  Well, there is no need to tell anyone what Burton is famous for and it is evidently no old wives' tale that the well water has something to do with the quality of the brew, just as the waters of the Liffey are reputed to give Irish stout its special quality. However, we didn't visit Burton in order to take the waters but to spend a day at the extremely fine branch we have opened there at the corner of Station Street and the High Street. We imagine that this must be about the finest commercial building in the town—a delight to the eye both outside and in. The facade sweeps round the corner site in a graceful curve, brick-built above stonework of polished grey granite, the portico at the front and side entrances being lined with a green marble, both colours being beautifully grained. Inside, the walls are decorated in a pastel (mushroom) colour and the woodwork of the counter, screens and panelling is quite the loveliest we have seen.

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A single silver vase of flowers kept on the table strikes just the right note. The office is very light and airy, with large windows right down one side and along the front. The floors upstairs are being fitted out for a large firm of solicitors and if you want to see the very latest thing in decoration this is the place to visit. Doors painted in pastel blue enamel, walls in various pastel shades, with the fourth wall deep red, dark green and so on. You won't see anything more modern in any of the London branch buildings which have been receiving so much publicity, and the whole building, both branch and offices, is, in its own style, as much a showplace as anything we possess and from its roof outside the caretaker's flat a fine view over the town can be obtained in every direction. We meet many interesting people on our travels and time alone prevented us from making the acquaintance of someone whom we have wanted to meet since boyhood days when at a seaside town we heard a comedian describe a certain person's job as “painting spots on rocking horses”.

 

1956 Burton upon Trent Interior 1 BGA Ref 30-490

Image © Barclays Ref 0030/0490

 

1956 Burton upon Trent Interior 2 BGA Ref 30-490.jpg

Image © Barclays Ref 0030/0490

 

Well, most of the rocking horses are made in Burton and as someone must paint the spots on them we were obviously not far from realising this little ambition. Another time, maybe! Thirty miles away we once shook hands with a sagger maker's bottom knocker. The “What's My Line?” organiser did not exhaust the possibilities of this part of the world when he featured the last-named gentleman. The new branch is managed by a very well-known personality, our old friend Mr. George L. Jackson,  whose activities first as Secretary and then as Chairman of the Staff Association have earned both our gratitude and admiration. We went to his new home to call for Mrs. Jackson who joined us for lunch. His house has several attractive amenities including a flat roof which commands an excellent view of the countryside, and his garden, a third of an acre in extent, is attractively planned, well stocked and in excellent heart. Most garden lovers would envy him. This branch is Mr. Jackson's first appointment.   All his pre­vious service having been in the Merseyside district, at Liverpool City Office, Castle Street, Claughton Village, Trustee Department and 99 Stanley Road.

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We were pleased to meet his two daughters, the elder of whom hopes to go to a university and aspires to be an architect. The younger does not seem averse to banking as a career. Mr. J. L. Alexander is second-in-command. He commenced his career at Ulverston in 1936, going to Barrow in 1947 and Walsall in 1949. Mr. T. M. Brown decided to make a career of banking after initial experience with the Rolls-Royce Company and entered the bank last year, first on Midland District Office relief staff and then at Derby. Miss M. K. Brambley had only been in the Bank a week at the time of our visit and by the time these notes appear she will have been joined by Miss A. G. Miller. Miss Brambley, too, has had prior business experience. The new branch has made an excellent start and we were most impressed with everything we saw. The whole set-up is one of which to be proud.

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Image © Barclays Ref 0030/0490

 

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1956 Miss M K Brambley MBM-Au56P10.jpg

1956 Mr T M Brown MBM-Au56P10.jpg

1956 to 1964 Mr G L Jackson Manager MBM-Wi64P08.jpg

1956 to 1964 onwards  Mr JL ALexander pro Manager from 1964 MBM-Sp64P07.jpg

1963 Miss M Halliday Cashier MBM-Wi63P31.jpg

1964 Mr A Atkin Manager MBM-Wi64P07.jpg

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Miss M K Brambley

On the Staff

1956

Mr T M Brown

On the Staff

1956

Mr G L Jackson

Opened this branch as Manager 1956 to 1964

Mr J L Alexander

On Staff  1956

Pro Manager 1964 to ?

Miss M Halliday

Cashier

1963

Mr Alan Atkin

Manager

1964 onwards

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1964 to 1966 Mr F Needham Limited Auth from 1965 MBM-Au66P05.jpg

BW Logo

BW Logo

BW Logo

BW Logo

BW Logo

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Mr F Needham

Limited Authority

1964 to 1966

 

 

 

 

 

 

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BARCLAYS BANK LIMITED

High Street

Borough Road

LLOYDS BANK LIMITED

High Street

Borough Road

Stapenhill

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MARTINS BANK LIMITED

Station Road

MIDLAND BANK LIMITED

High Street

Borough Road

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NATIONAL PROVINCIAL BANK

WESTMINSTER BANK LIMITED

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Title:

Type:

Address:

Index Number and District:

Hours:

 

Telephone:

Services:

Manager:

Martins Bank Limited 11-37-20 Burton Upon Trent

Full Branch

1 Station Road Burton upon Trent Staffordshire

570 Midland

Mon to Fri 1000-1500

Saturday 0900-1130

Burton-u-T 2427/2604

Nightsafe installed

Mr A Atkin Manager

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May 1956

15 December 1969

Martins Bank Limited

Barclays Bank Limited 20-15-96 Burton on Trent

Currently

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